Friday, October 31, 2014

Kent State Interim Dean Updates Commissioners on Campus
July 17, 2014 by Ann Wishart | No Comments

Where else can you get a world-class education from a world-class faculty for $6,000 a year? Jerrod Tudor

The growth of Kent State University Geauga Campus is causing interim Dean Jarrod Tudor to look at expanding programs and shifting some events into the community.

“We just keep growing and growing and growing,” Tudor told Geauga County Commissioners at their meeting Thursday.

KSU Geauga has the second largest student body of all regular KSU campuses, he said, crediting the enrollment manager and team members for the numbers.

But since he took the interim dean’s position July 1, replacing David Mohan, Tudor said he has discovered more reasons why other KSU campus deans are jealous of him.

“The first thing I learned is there is a tremendous amount of (community) support for this campus,” he said.

His plans for his tenure at KSU Geauga include developing the campus as much as possible by bringing more four-year programs to Geauga, especially in the allied health field, he said.

“I’m here to help. Kent State wants to be a problem solver in the community, where we can,” Tudor said.

The strength of the campus is partly due to the affordability of the education people can acquire there.

“The future of higher education is really changing,” Tudor said, adding the tuition price tag is the most noticeable change, which makes getting an education at Geauga campus a good deal.

“Where else can you get a world-class education from a world-class faculty for $6,000 a year?” he said.

Another reason the Geauga campus is at the top is because of its retention of high-quality students and the improved graduation rate, Tudor said.

In fact, graduation ceremonies are outgrowing the facility and he suggested ceremonies in the future may have to be held next door at the Geauga County Fairgrounds.

“What’s great about the KSU Geauga campus is the parking is really close to the buildings,” Commissioner Mary Samide said, and it is free. “Also, you don’t have to matriculate to the main campus for some programs.”

Tudor, who said he hopes to get back to teaching next year, has taken up residence in Burton Village less than a mile from his office on campus and the commute to work is not stressful, he said.

Although he was warned by colleagues he would need a four-wheel-drive vehicle if he moved into the snow belt, Tudor said he has been reassured the road departments in Geauga County keep the roads clear in all weather.

Tudor has taught courses for KSU ranging from paralegal studies to journalism to justice studies, served on the executive committee of the university’s faculty senate, has master of arts and juris doctor degrees from the University of Toledo, and has master of law degrees from both Cleveland State University and the University of Akron.

He also received a master of public administration, master of business administration and doctorate degrees from Kent State.

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